Performance Anxiety in Disc Golf: R-E-L-A-X

Working through performance anxiety. It all started in the 4th grade at the spelling bee. It was round 1, they gave me an easy word I was capable of spelling. The word was “Growl”.

I step up to the microphone to dominate this easy word and move onto the next round.  But I don’t. My nerves and performance anxiety get the best of me. This is what comes out “G, O…” and a loud sigh. I knew as soon as I said the letter “o” that I had messed up. Also, that my spelling bee dreams were over.

What happened? Why did I mess up such as easy word?  I knew I could spell growl. It kept playing over and over in my head as I sat in the audience to watch the remainder of the spelling bee. This moment was the beginning of me acknowledging my performance anxiety. I still struggle with anxiety related to competition as an adult and know many competitors do as well.
howl growl

It seems that for the last year when I compete in disc golf tournaments I am consistently performing under my skill level. I know I still have a lot to learn, as this sport always provides learning opportunities.  Increased practice and playing the courses more before the tournament would help. However, my blunders on the course seem to be very much related to my mental game. It all seems to boil down to performance anxiety.

The thing is I don’t get angry. I try to brush off the bad shots. Take each shot as it is. For some reason my body doesn’t want to relax during a tournament.

I have found when I play in my Thursday night Disc On! Ladies League (DOLLs) that I generally more often than not, play very well. My drives set me up for at least 1-2 birdies per round. It is not uncommon for me to make a couple 30’+ putts. I rarely miss a 10′ or less putt. However, these moves are not the case during a tournament. I find I easily get into a routine of missing many 10′ or less putts during these rounds, to make my 3’s turn to 4’s and my 4′ turn to 5’s. The difference being at DOLLs leagues, there is a lot of giggling. We keep score we aren’t playing to compete against each other–it is more for the social and fun aspects of it. I suppose I am not overthinking these league rounds and performance anxiety does not become a factor.

As I have been noticing my inconsistent tournament performance vs. my casual rounds, I have been trying to pin point how I can translate this better play into tournament performance. In addition to more practice and familiarity with the courses. The main thing I need to do is what Aaron Rodgers, the best quarterback in the NFL said when fans were worried about the Greenbay Packers 2014 season, he had 5 letters “R-E-L-A-X!” The fans relaxed and the team went on to have a 12 and 4 season and win the NFC North division.

http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-network-gameday/0ap3000000401519/Rodgers-R-E-L-A-X-remix

I know when I make a great putt or throw a good drive my body mainly my upper shoulders and neck are relaxed. I just need to work on relaxing and staying focused. All while not taking the game too seriously and just remember that my body knows what to do.

What do you do to relax on the course? How have you worked through mental struggles that turn into inconsistencies?

Some Like it Hot…or Not!

Author:

PDGA #21224

 

 

 

Temperatures are starting to heat up here in the Midwest, and I am sure all over the country.  I recently played in the Wisco Disco tournament in Madison, WI where the heat index was in the middle 90’s.  During and after the tournament many of the ladies were asking how to stay cool and hydrated in those conditions. Some ladies were suffering physically from the heat and humidity.  The team at Ladies First Disc Golf thought it would be a great idea to do the research for you! Check out these tips for beating the heat during your rounds so that you can stay safe.

Regulate Your Temperature

The goal for everyone playing in oppressive heat indices is to make sure your body can cool itself. If your body struggles to regulate its temperature, you can start to suffer from heat-related conditions of heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke.  As the turtle in Finding Nemo says, “you’re going to have a bad day!”  Your body cools itself by the evaporation of sweat from your skin, so with humidity less evaporation occurs making it difficult to keep your body temp normal.

Women Carrying Water on a Disc Golf Course

Photo Credit: Lauren E. Lakeberg

A key way to assist your body is by hydrating like mad before, during, and after your rounds.  If you have been to a PDGA Major, you have heard Chuck’s battle cry, “Be a grape, not a raisin”.  Since there are many factors involved with how much to drink, a general rule of thumb is to drink about a half liter of water every hour; up this amount if heat index is really high or you are playing a strenuous course.  You can also gauge how much water you should drink after a round by weighing yourself before and after your round, then replace each pound lost with 20 ounces of water.

Hydration Beyond Water

To sport drink or not to sport drink, that is a tricky question.  There are many articles out there about sport drinks, electrolyte mixes, etc.  I think it comes down to the weather conditions and personal preference.  Water is your top priority, and I suggest trying sports drinks and/or a variety of electrolyte mixes to see if you perform better with certain products.  I have been playing disc golf for over 17 years so I have tried my fair share of products.  I have found sport drinks such as Powerade/Gatorade to be too heavy on my gut and feel like a whale after drinking.

Disc Golf Women

Photo Credit: Lauren E. Lakeberg

I also have developed an allergy to certain fake sugars such as sucralose and stevia, so I cannot tolerate the “no sugar added” mixes/tablets, but I really liked the electrolyte tablets from NUUN as you could just carry them in your bag and add to water as needed.  I gave out tablets to my card mates at the Wisco Disco and they loved them.  Now I use the NUUN Performance Hydration powder.  I can add it to my water bottle as needed, and it gives me the electrolytes I need to re-hydrate. It also has the carbs I need for energy being a masters-age player.

Another tip I found while researching, if you like to be frugal, is to use a small amount of Celtic Sea Salt to add minerals/electrolytes to your water.

Erin Oakley’s tip is to add fruit chunks to water, and then freeze it overnight.  You will have some nutrients in cool water for your afternoon round.  So keep chugging fluids, and try out a few options to see what works best to keep you hydrated and performing well on the course.

Heat Exhaustion Know the Signs

Women playing disc golf

Photo Credit: Lauren E. Lakeberg

I went down with heat exhaustion at the Mid America Open in steaming Columbia, Missouri several years ago.  I had the classic symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, dry mouth, muscle cramps, and nausea.  Luckily one of my card mates knew about cooling the body quickly at pulse points, and got me through the last 2 holes to get to tournament central for shade/water.  Putting cool water, ice packs, or cool rags on pulse points for several minutes cools down the blood so that as it travels along the blood stream it cools the body.  Easily accessible pulse points include the inner wrists, the neck, inner elbows, and the back of the knees.

Obviously the easy one would be to put a cool towel/rag on your neck. I have had great results with rubbing ice or putting a cold towel on my wrists to cool down as well.  My friend, Nadine, freezes damp towels and then carries them in her cart to use on her neck during rounds.

women disc golfers with umbrella

Photo Credit: Lauren E. Lakeberg

Next, finding shade/cooler spaces on the course as often as possible will help in keeping your body cool.  Veteran Erin Oakley says that “heat stroke is no joke”. Erin suggests using an umbrella if you are on an open course.  We also joke about “shade golf” or “master’s golf”, and finding shade anywhere you can as you move down the fairway.  The temperature swing between being out in the sun and in the shade can be a 5-10 degree difference.  So take advantage of the shade when you can.

Better Safe Than Sorry

Finally, be aware of how you are feeling both mentally and physically, and ask for help if you need.  While caddying during Am Worlds one year, a woman on the card ahead went down. I called the TD to send help, and then when the situation took a turn for the worse I called 911.  Better to be safe than sorry.  (Another pro tip: always have the TD’s phone number with you for emergencies).  Please keep an eye on your fellow card mates as well—we are all family.  Notice if they are struggling and offer suggestions to them.  Many times someone suffering from heat exhaustion or heat stroke cannot focus or think clearly and they may need some assistance.  If you are really concerned, get them in the shade, try some cooling on pulse points, and call the TD.  The TD may opt to pull them off the course, and possibly call for medic.

Keeping cool and hydrated during the hot summer rounds will not only keep you performing better, but can keep you from some serious heat-related illnesses.  Use these tips, do some research, and ask your fellow disc golfers for suggestions.  Watch for more articles from the Ladies First Disc Golf Team.  Keep sparkling (and hydrated) on the courses!

Credit to the author & photographer:

Tracey “TraLo” Lopez has been discing for over 18 years.  She competes in the FP40 division and is sponsored by Ladies First Disc Golf.  She has run disc golf clinics, youth leagues, women’s leagues; assisted/volunteered with tournaments; written disc golf/wellness articles and has done public speaking engagements. TraLo was a fitness/wellness coordinator for a parks and recreation department for 17 years, moving to public works 4 years ago. She has recently been certified as a Life/Wellness Coach and re-certified as a Personal Trainer, to continue her passion for wellness & mindfulness and bring it to the disc golf community.  Watch for her upcoming Blog: On Center w/ TraLo.
Thank you to Lauren E. Lakeberg for the use of photo’s.
To follow Lauren’s disc golf photo’s:
Facebook The Disc Golf Photographer 
Instagram @thediscgolfphotographer

 

Comforts of Being Uncomfortable: Playing Disc Golf in Winter

Erin Oakley is one of the most recognizable forces of the growth of women’s disc golf, she plays disc golf in any weather and loves winter disc golf. She is a member of Team Innova, Luna Disc, Disc 2 Basket and a Ladies First Disc Golf Sparkle Sister. Erin has hosted prominent women’s disc golf tournaments such as Disc Girls Gone Wild and the 2018 United States Women’s Disc Golf Championships. Weather doesn’t stop Erin from enjoying her favorite hobby disc golf. Read Erin’s tips if you are playing disc golf for the first time in snow, cold and winter conditions. 

There is No Off Season for Disc Golf

Many disc golfers may refer to the winter months as the “off season”. While I may not be competing much in the winter, I don’t refer to any months as “off season”. I will normally play disc golf in any weather and I especially love winter disc golf golf as it actually helps me tune in my game. Winter disc golf in Michigan is often cold, wet and snowy. These conditions require me to bundle up in extra layers and thick boots which help me remember to slow my movements down and focus on what really counts, the flow and follow through. Using these tools in the winter really helps my game in the nicer weather because I keep the flow simple.

Going into my 19th season of disc golf and also having the maternal instincts, I am always prepared for any weather conditions. Here are some of the things I have learned over the years in being able to enjoy throwing in all kinds of weather.

Clothing

When playing winter disc golf be sure to layer up in loose layers. I usually have one layer close to the skin, such as Nike or Under Armor tights. These tights were made to keep the body heat in.  I will then layer up with at least one loose fitting long sleeve shirt and a sweatshirt over that. Keep the loose layers on actually helps keep that body heat in. If it is extreme cold, I will add a thin wind breaker or rain jacket over top which will block the wind from going through the other layers and makes you extra toasty. It is always better to wear more than you think you need so if you do get warm you can take a layer off. It is much harder to add layers later than take one off.

Foot Gear

I have multiple pairs of wool socks and I love them! I wear those with my waterproof socks over top of the wool socks with my waterproof boots. Waterproof foot gear is the best way to go when playing winter disc golf. There is nothing worse than have wet and cold feet. Even if there is no snow or water on the ground, the waterproof socks act like the wind breaker, they help hold the heat in. Avoid standing around on cement as this will make your feet colder when you are waiting to play winter disc golf. As a TD, if I have to run a tournament in cold weather, I will bring a small piece of carpet or rug to stand on in the shelter where tournament central is.

Hands

Mittens, not gloves! I will only use mittens in winter with hand warmers inside. Gloves will always leave my fingers cold, even if I have hand warmers in them. Using mittens will keep all the heat in the same space. They are also easier to put on and take off your throwing hand. And speaking of hand warmers, I read a tip online a couple winters ago on how to keep them going for longer to save on buying so many.  When you are done with your round, place your hand warmers in a zip lock baggie and press out all the air so it is airtight. This will make them go dormant. I’ve left mine in the baggie for a week at a time and used them again the following week. They are just as hot as when you put them in there! Amazing!

Towels

Glittery Towels Dry Discs Better

Place your extra towels in a large zip lock baggie. This will keep the extras dry if it is snowing or raining. I only have 1-2 out at a time to make them last as long as possible through the round.

 

Rain Gear

Rain gear is not only for the rain! As I mentioned above, a rain jacket can help keep the heat in! Rain gear is not as thick as a winter coat or snow pants. I have a rain jacket and pants that I wear in the winter to stay dry from the snow and or rain.

My last tip is to use a canteen/metal style water bottle and put warm water in there. If you have a nice bottle, your drink won’t freeze up on you while you are out in the cold. Stay hydrated in the cold months too as this is just as important as staying hydrated in the summer!

 

Hope you all enjoy your winter discing!

–Erin Oakley

PDGA #17643

The Comforts of Being Uncomfortable: Standing Up To Your Fears

I’ve always been a scared-y cat.

When I was about 5 or 6 years old I was Upnorth (Northern Wisconsin for anyone not familiar with the term “Upnorth”) visiting my granny like we did every summer. We were at a small amusement park of sorts which had a train that ran through the park. Little did I know that this wasn’t a normal peaceful train ride.

During the train ride robbers come to rob the guests on the train. Obviously the train robbers were actors, as we were at an amusement park. However, it was not obvious to young Jenny that they were not really robbing the train. When the train robbers approached our train car, I panicked and started balling my eyes out. My mom had to carry me off the train as I could just not grasp that I was not in danger and that it was all in my head. Since I was being a scared-y cat it was a good time ruined by unnecessary fear that I created in my mind.

The only thing to fear is fear itself.

Fear is a powerful emotion and your brain is a powerful organ. Together if you don’t face your fear or over power your mind, you will let fear ruin a lot of good times for you.

The decision to quit…

Early this year I made a decision that I would quit my full time job as the operations manager at Holland Bulb Farms.

Me, in full Operations Manager Mode.

I made this decision in January and the main reason was to focus more on Ladies First Disc Golf. Although fear of change, and the comfort of a steady job had been holding me back from this decision for a couple of years. I planned for 6 months before I decided I would pick a quit date and tell my boss of my plans. It was nice having time to prep, but it also gave me a lot of time to think.

As I got closer to the day I planned to tell my boss my decision and plans–there were a mix of emotions. I was excited for a new opportunity, but also terrified of what may happen. Fear was a strong emotion I was feeling prior to my planned quit date.

Initially I feared my boss’s reaction–would he be upset? Would he react poorly and send me packing that very day? Since I made this decision, planned and wrote it down in my dream book I couldn’t back down. I had to face my fears.

To some people quitting a job may be a sweet victory or a relief. For me I held this position for 8 years and have a bit of a loyalty complex, I have a habit of being dependable. Quitting was more than letting my boss down, it was also the fear of losing out on what I had and the fear of the unknown.

I knew I had the ability to practice putt at work, that was a bonus!

I knew what I had at my current job, but was feeling stagnant. I had to change–I had to challenge myself. I had to run directly into the fear of failure, disappointment and embrace being uncomfortable.

Lunch Break Disc Golf Was Something I Always Looked Forward To!

It was the only way I could grow, develop and attain what I really wanted.

The day I told my boss, I was a ball of nerves the entire morning. Even with the preparation and knowing my boss is a level headed and kind person, I was still in fear. When I started the conversation that day with my boss early into the conversation all my fears diminished. He was excited for me and understood my reasons for my decision. He was even nice enough to agree to keep employed part time, in a new role as Garden Expert. After all that worrying, and letting fear rule me for quite some time over this choice the outcome was greater than I could have ever imagined.

On my last day as Operations Manager July 27th, 2018

Fear and limiting beliefs in disc golf.

At this point you may be wondering how does this relate to disc golf (other than the fact I will have more time to dedicate to Ladies First Disc Golf) Well, fear may be limiting you from reaching your full potential or experiencing all that disc golf has to offer.

 

If you fear putting on an elevated basket you’re less likely to become good at making those putts. Step outside your comfort zone and go for it next time you encounter an elevated basket.

Maybe you are a backhand dominant player and need to learn to throw forehand but fear looking silly. Perhaps you fear throwing less than 5′ and into the ground. To overcome this practice only forehand for several rounds.

Lady of the Month Eleanor looking awesome throwing a forehand off the tee!

It may be uncomfortable and your scores may be higher during those rounds.

Sarah Hokom the BEST forehand thrower in the FPO division.

Over time you will get over those feelings of discomfort and throwing flat and with more accuracy.

Sparkle Sister Sara Lamberson Approaching with a forehand.

Want more tips on the basics of forehand and backhand throws? Check out this article from Discgolf4women.com 

Fear may also be preventing you from meeting new people in disc golf. If you are afraid of meeting new people at a ladies league or tournament you are more than likely missing out on creating some life long friendships.

Remember we were all new once, and all most likely had that same feeling of fear and not fitting in.

Perhaps you have been playing tournaments and have been crushing it in the division  you have been playing in. If your rating is closer the high end cut off and you are dominating those divisions perhaps it is time to try playing in a higher division. Maybe you fear losing and not keeping up with more skilled players. After all winning and being the most skilled player on your card is much more comfortable than the opposite. However, growth and learning often does not come from a place of comfort.

To truly elevate your game and reach your full potential you must challenge yourself and risk being uncomfortable. Step up your game, face the fear of losing and potential embarrassment and step into a place of growth!

The time is now, embrace fear and the feelings of discomfort.

If you are making excuses for in disc golf–you are most likely making these excuses as you are afraid and don’t want to feel uncomfortable. I know this because I am a scared-y cat who makes excuses to not feel uncomfortable. But I am working on becoming a fearless lioness, who doesn’t let fear stop me from doing cool things and meeting new people. Life is meant to be lived, so go out and live it! If you are contemplating or holding your self back–just get up and go do it! Worst case scenario is you learn something new.

Blog Series: The Comforts of Being Uncomfortable-You’re Welcome. Or am I? The feeling of not fitting in.

You’re Welcome. Or am I? The feeling of not fitting in.

This is the first in a series to help women step out of their comfort zone when it comes to disc golf. What better place to start than the initial introduction to the disc golf world?  Beyond just you, your local course and some discs, there is a whole community of disc golfers, some may even call these people disc golf family. When you are new to leagues, tournaments and the greater disc golf scene it is easy (especially if you are an introvert like myself) to question if you are welcome in this whole new world (cue the Aladdin music).

AND if you are questioning if you fit in or are welcome, stop. Because the disc golf family is one of the most inclusive groups of people out there. So yes, you are welcome and you will eventually find your tribe if you haven’t already.

Still unsure if you will fit in or still unsure if you are welcome into this world of flying discs? I understand your concerns and worry; I have been there too.

I have been playing disc golf events since 2009 and I still on occasion feel unsure about fitting in, could be my tendency to overthink things.

Every time I let these thoughts creep into my head, I am reminded of where I started and where this amazing community of disc golfers has brought me, and quickly quiet those concerns.

A little history on the early days when I really questioned if I was welcome. The Western Lakes Open on March 15, 2009 hosted by Terry Miller aka The Disc Golf Guy was my first PDGA event. My boyfriend Jason (now husband) was signing up and after talking to Terry, who we didn’t know at the time, convinced Jason to encourage me to sign up. We did. We signed up.

We didn’t have a clue about organized disc golf at this time, and I had only been playing for about 10 months. We had no mini markers, and had to purchase them at the tournament. We certainly did not have  disc golf bags. We came equipped with 6-8 discs each comfortably held in our fanny packs. We had no clue what to expect, and when we got to the event we were in for a bit of a culture shock. These people had bags that were strapped to their back holding discs, calisthenics were going on, and I got advice from “disc dog” on throwing forehand. People were friendly, but it was all so new it wasn’t an instant new family embrace—not to say we weren’t wanting more at the end of the day, but I was still unsure if I belonged.

Jason’s love for competition had him eager to play another event.  A few weeks after our first tournament we signed up for a tournament called “Parkside of the Moon” at the University of Wisconsin- Parkside. We had not played this course before, but we did upgrade from our fanny packs to Innova Sport bags. I was nervous and excited for this event because unlike the Western Lakes Open there were a total of 4 other women signed up. Until this point the only other woman I played disc golf with was at the Western Lakes Open. One of the women on the tournament registration was Barrett White, I knew a little about her, that she was kind of a big deal, and that she could throw!

Again, being a bit on the shy side I was nervous to meet this new group of women, I still didn’t know much about organized disc golf. After a few holes into the tournament Barrett asked me, “What discs do you have in your bag?” I will admit when she asked me, because I had only been playing for 10 months and didn’t really know a lot about my discs I was a bit embarrassed and apprehensive to divulge the details.  One of the discs (and I still have it) was the Quest Technologies T-bone, I knew it wasn’t a super popular disc.  With the dimple technology the t-bone has I thought people may think I am a weirdo for throwing this disc. I didn’t know Barrett at the time, and that she is one of the nicest people I know with an inquisitive mind, who loves discs, and that is why she was inquiring.

Later in the round on hole 10 the wind was howling. I took an 8 on that hole. The other 4 ladies carded scores much closer to par. I again felt embarrassed and that I didn’t fit in. As I said my score one of the ladies in the group Carla, had made a comment that they have all been there before and started recalling high scores earned at previous events. This sharing of a similar experience made me feel not so bad about my snowman.

Towards the end of the round on hole 16, there is a building the left of the tee pad, yet pretty far out of the way.  I managed to throw my drive off the tee into a window on the building, all we heard was a loud thud, luckily the glass wasn’t broken. Embarrassing again, but if I recall correctly we all got a good chuckle from this errant throw.

At the end of the event, I know I didn’t place to win any funny money. However, Barrett did come up to me and give me a 165 Elite X Comet, I was stunned by her generosity. On the way home from the event, I had mixed feelings, I felt uncomfortable for most of the day, but at the same time I had this yearning to play again, and meet more disc golf friends.

The next event we played was our local tournament called the Greater Milwaukee Open. I didn’t know any of the 3 ladies playing in this event, and didn’t hit any buildings off the tee, but still came in last place.  After the 2009 GMO I didn’t play any tournaments that summer or early fall, due to work and needing to take a bit of a competition break. I was still feeling a bit uncomfortable and wasn’t confident in my skills.

A local event came up in late November called the Cold Turkey, we decided to sign up. I was feeling refreshed and yearning for more competition after a 6 month break. It was the first event I ever won, and I could tell my skills had improved since earlier in Spring. At this point I could say I had fully caught the disc golf addiction and was ready for the 2010 season. I was starting to feel a lot more welcome and comfortable in with the disc golf community, after a season and a few events to scope out the scene.

2010 brought many more events, and a decent amount of women playing in these events. The feeling of not fitting in, was going away. One of the ladies, Carla, from the Parkside of the Moon event had become my friend on Facebook, and Carla being kind, caring and cool as a cucumber with a similar interest in plants we started chatting more. Over time, we started to get to know each other better, and as of 2018 I consider Carla to be a true disc golf sister to me. In 2009 I was shy, nervous and unsure if I would ever be like the disc golf gals that I met at Parkside of the Moon. Reflecting back over the last 9 years I can certainly say I have learned a lot from them.

First casual round of many with Carla, Katrina, Sergio and Jason

Carla and I, as mentioned, over time got to know each other and have worked on growing disc golf in Wisconsin for women for years now.

Carla and Jenny working on women’s disc golf

That wasn’t the only woman at the Parkside of the Moon who I looked up to. Barrett White, being a disc golf icon, had me in awe. For the first couple of years I was too nervous and shy to say hi to her if I saw her at my local course or event. My husband Jason being the outgoing fellow he is, would say hi to her, but I would hope that I would go unnoticed. This all changed in 2011 when I was playing an event that Barrett was also at. First round we played together, and my nerves must have created laser focus, cause I was playing on a higher level than normal.  In between rounds there was a close race for 1st place with me and another gal. Barrett came up to me and gave me a fist bump and some words of encouragement—I was shaking with excitement, it was the confidence boost I needed to win the event. With words from a hero of mine, I was really starting to know I was welcome with the disc golf family.

 

Leave It To Beaver Group Round 1 2011 Barrett, Alana, Me and Jen Thatcher

Flash forward to 2018 Barrett is still a hero of mine, but also one of my closest disc golf friends, and we have enjoyed many many rounds of disc golf together.

 

Last reflection before I wrap it up. I mentioned the 2009 GMO and coming in last place and meeting some disc golf ladies. Well the woman who won the 2009 GMO Jennifer Thatcher, has also become one of my closest disc golf friends. For our first 2 or 3 years of disc golf competition we were battling back and forth in the Intermediate Women’s’ Division, one could even say we were rivals. However,our competitive beginnings have brought forth a wonderful friendship of support and disc golf.

Jenny and Jennifer enjoying golf and life!

If I would have stopped playing competitive disc golf, due to feeling silly, wearing a fanny pack, throwing my driver into a building, or coming in last place over and over I wouldn’t have the friends I do today. So many things for women’s disc golf wouldn’t have happened if I chose to not persevere through the feelings of discomfort. If you are thinking of playing in  your first disc golf event or have played a few but didn’t think you fit in, or didn’t like the feelings of discomfort that can come from starting something new, competition or not fitting….I suggest you embrace the comforts of being uncomfortable and sign up for your first disc golf tournament this year. Who knows where it will take you, maybe you’ll meet a life long friend, or discover you have more skills than you thought you did.

P.S. A wonderful event for your first disc golf tournament is the PDGA Women’s Global Event. You will be competing against women from the whole world of similar skill level to you. Click here to find an event in your area:

 

https://www.pdga.com/women/global-event

 

Intro: The Comforts of Appreciating the Uncomfortable

I have been stranded on my couch for the past 4 days with the worst flu I have experienced in 10+ years. This illness and time of rest has provided a great deal of insight and inspiration. Who would have thought something so awful as the influenza virus could provide an opportunity for a new blog series? As my husband reminds me their is always a silver lining to every experience. A silver lining to being laid up with the flu is the prospect of being healthy, productive and back to your normal self. All the down time has allowed free space in my mind to think of new ideas.  Several days of feeling uncomfortable have taught me to appreciate the feelings of comfort.

Early this morning I was unable to sleep due to my various flu related symptoms. I started thinking about being uncomfortable. How we as humans don’t like the feeling of being uncomfortable. We do whatever we can to stay in our comfort zone. I am often guilty of being one of these humans. Writing this blog post made me a little uncomfortable.  The topics in this blog series may also bring up feelings of discomfort.  I know that growth, strength and learning often do not come from a place of comfort.

 

Playing disc golf is fun! BUT it can also be uncomfortable–whether it’s learning a new part of the game, competing, weather, mental aspects or any other life nuances. Even though disc golf is our favorite activity, it’s not glitter & sparkles all the time.

I invite you to our monthly series where we will cover different disc golf topics and situations that may make you feel uncomfortable. It won’t hurt it will only help all of us in this diverse disc golf family to grow, step outside our comfort zone and learn to get comfortable with appreciating the uncomfortable.